Monday, July 10, 2006

JUSTICE!

Today is a great day to be an American.

"Cleanflicks" has bitten the dust.
http://www.calendarlive.com/movies/cl-fi-clean10jul10,0,4583837.story?coll=cl-movies

A federal judge in Denver, Colorado has handed down a ruling that (duh) the Utah-based movie editors and their like have been violating the laws of the United States, and have to cease.

I don't have to explain to you why this is a major victory for freedom. The good guys won, the bad guys lost, and The Faithful can take a walk. This round goes to the REAL Americans.

6 comments:

Reel Fanatic said...

Amen, brother ... censorship, in any form, simply sucks

Matt Cornell said...

This might be a blow to the 1st Amendment, especially in future claims of "Fair Use." I'm thinking of many works which re-edit copyrighted material, including your own "Take a Bite Out of Crime" video featured on this blog.

This "victory for Freedom" as you call it, sets a precedent which could lead to the end of other appropriationist works-- most of them secular and satirical.

That includes yours!

Bob said...

"This "victory for Freedom" as you call it, sets a precedent which could lead to the end of other appropriationist works-- most of them secular and satirical."

The only "new" legal precedent set by this ruling is that there is no exception for "moral reasons" in laws against unauthorized editing.

The other provisions of the "fair use" laws are all basically safe via prior precedent: "appropriationist" art is allowable when a certain percentage of the original work has been altered. Satire and parody are still protected as a form of free speech.

Cleanflicks operation was illegal because they were selling unauthorized edits of other people's work without permission and against their wishes. This is, and has always been, against the law in this Country.

The only thing this ruling does is to uphold pre-existing laws. Note that the ruling was explicitly narrow in it's definition, and re-affirms the right of citizens to edit their own private-use copies of the works, either manually or through ClearPlay (which is fully legal and which, though I find it personally distasteful, I support on the merits of law.)

Anonymous said...

By that rationale, if the Clean Flicks people were to alter films and then to put them on the internet for free on IFilm say or offer them complimentary discs, would this constitute a problem?

And also, if this constitutes a crime, how do you feel about other unauthorized versions of films, such as a few years back when that guy made a new version of the Phantom Menace and began selling bootlegs. Would you oppose that on principle as well?

Wesley said...

Yes! Put it out on the wires, tell them how to bring the bastards down(que army grunt tapping out morse code) but seriously, I've been missing your social commentary, hope you keep up the good work(my first few post need A LOT of work)

Bob said...

"By that rationale, if the Clean Flicks people were to alter films and then to put them on the internet for free on IFilm say or offer them complimentary discs, would this constitute a problem?"

Yes, it would. Because they would still be mis-representing copyrighted work even if not for profit. The phony trailers on sites like YouTube or iFilm are protected under the fair-use law and under precedent relating to parody; an entire re-cut movie is not.

"And also, if this constitutes a crime, how do you feel about other unauthorized versions of films, such as a few years back when that guy made a new version of the Phantom Menace and began selling bootlegs. Would you oppose that on principle as well?"

The "Phantom Editor's" rationale is infinitely less vile than that of CleanFlicks, so yeah I lost considerably less sleep over it. However, YES, on principal he committed a crime and if someone wanted to take him to task for it I wouldn't oppose it.