Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Big Picture: "Night of the Lepus"

17 comments:

MD said...

"This is what Elmer Fudd sees on mushrooms" HA! Love it.

Anonymous said...

I thought you were going to make a reference to Monty Python's "Killer Rabbit" from the Holy Grail movie.

aa-moran said...

Just out of curiosity regarding your "bunnies can't be scary" line, have you ever seen Watership Down?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5I9izys2ek

MD said...

@aa-moran
That is a very very good point! Watership Down is a rather horrific and haunting piece of film. I think it has more potency in it's horror elements because it's animation. Animation (especially traditional hand drawn animation) typically has a natural abstraction of reality to it, without sacrificing the weight of whats happening on screen. When you see things like animated bunnies rending flesh from the bones of others in blood rage it makes your skin crawl in all the right ways. I think there is something to be said for "Night of the Lemus" failing to capture any real horror because it's basically loosely edited jump cuts of actual adorable lil' fuzzbukets in "scaled" sets.
Though I fully agree with you, bunnies can indeed be terrifying!!

MD said...

*"Night of the Lepus"
lol typos gotta love em

aa-moran said...

@MD

Also, its pretty interesting to note that rabbits are actually violent little beast when pushed far enough. Watership Down isn't too much of a stretch from their behavior. Hell they even eat their own young if they discover that their warren might be under attack.

MD said...

@aa-morran

Very true! Most rodents and small mammals that are generally portrayed as "cute and cuddly little creatures" possess potential to be diseased rabid little flesh eaters. Hell squirrels are pretty brutal little scrappers too. I guess most seemingly inoffensive, innocuous or pet friendly creatures are always going to be more violent survivors in nature.
It would be really interesting to see a live action monster film in that vein. Playing with the idea of turning cute and cuddlies into monstrous flesh eaters in a convincing way ala "The Thing" or "Generator Rex"? Sign me up!

Oscar said...

Talking about scary rabbits, have you seen The Maxx? Or Donnie Darko? Or this picture: http://media.photobucket.com/image/scary%20bunny%20costume/cddowden/scary_bunny.jpg ?

Atomic Skull said...

This movie was mentioned on an episode of Everybody hates Chris. It was supposedly the reason Chris's father is afraid of rabbits.

MD said...

@Oscar
True but then again...most things were pretty scary or at the very least abstract in "The MaXX" lol

Anonymous said...

Congratulations, Bob. I'm sure it must have been incredibly difficult to get through this entire summary without making a single Monty Python joke.

yamato-0 said...

@anonymous

Incidentally, that rabbit on Monty Python still seemed a lot more terrifying than the ones in this movie (at least judging from the footage Bob showed), and that's in spite of the fact that several scenes were obviously featuring a prop. I mean, as I recall, the characters themselves saw the rabbit, and took it about as seriously as the viewers would. Then all the sudden, it mauls several of Arthur's men, quickly doing a fine job of establishing that this is an extremely lithe mother fucker that you do NOT wanna mess with (least not without a Holy Hand Grenade). These rabbits in Night of the Lepus, though... they resemble nothing more than a herd of long-eared capybaras (large, but completely harmless to humans; an ironic contrast from Monty Python where its small size and swift movement actually makes it seem more dangerous). Anyone in the movie who's stupid enough to get themselves killed by something like that probably deserves to die.

Mads said...

Just nitpicking, but you used the cast away trailer of an example of a situation where the production company didn't control what the potential movie-goers knew...even though they probably really did.

Some movies are improved by being spoiled for their target demographic...there's evidence to back this up for written text, and there's no way that doesn't go for movies as well.

The cast away trailer was probably an intended spoiler, designed to improve the movie, rather than a "we give up" move.

Anonymous said...

Wasn't footage of this used in Natural Born Killers?

Lee Kalba said...

Yes, footage of this was used in Natural Born Killers.

I remember coming across this on cable, when I was around eight, and thinking it was funny, then.

I think Watership Down turns scary, partly because you watch it as a kid, expecting the usual, animated, fluffy bunny stuff and then watch them turn into monsters. It has the Old Yeller effect of taking something innocent into a dark place, which is much more disturbing than giant bunnies in slow-mo.

Sylocat said...

You know who we need to fight them...

Dav3 said...

Just for the record-

Night of the Lepus is playing on a TV in the background during the spoon-bending scene in The Matrix.

Unless they used a clip from some other giant bunny rampage movie.